Uranium Stocks List

Recent Signals

Date Stock Signal Type
2019-10-11 AAZ Calm After Storm Range Contraction
2019-10-11 AAZ Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-10-11 AL 20 DMA Support Bullish
2019-10-11 AZZ Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-10-11 AZZ Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 AZZ 1,2,3 Retracement Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 CCO Fell Below 20 DMA Bearish
2019-10-11 DML Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-10-11 DML Shooting Star Candlestick Bearish
2019-10-11 DML Doji - Bearish? Reversal
2019-10-11 DML Lizard Bearish Bearish Day Trade Setup
2019-10-11 EFR Bollinger Band Squeeze Range Contraction
2019-10-11 EFR 20 DMA Support Bullish
2019-10-11 FCU Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 FCU Boomer Sell Setup Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 FCU 1,2,3 Retracement Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 FSY Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bullish Bullish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 FSY 50 DMA Support Bullish
2019-10-11 FUU 1,2,3 Retracement Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 FUU Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 GXU 180 Bearish Setup Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 GXU Stochastic Reached Oversold Weakness
2019-10-11 ICM Pocket Pivot Bullish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 ICM Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 ICM Doji - Bearish? Reversal
2019-10-11 ICM Volume Surge Other
2019-10-11 JET Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-10-11 JET Fell Below 20 DMA Bearish
2019-10-11 LAM 180 Bearish Setup Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 LAM Expansion Breakdown Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 LAM Lower Bollinger Band Walk Weakness
2019-10-11 MGA Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-10-11 MGA Boomer Sell Setup Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 MGA NR7 Range Contraction
2019-10-11 MGA 1,2,3 Retracement Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 PTU Bollinger Band Squeeze Range Contraction
2019-10-11 PTU Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-10-11 PTU Stochastic Sell Signal Bearish
2019-10-11 PTU Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bullish Bullish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 PWM Doji - Bullish? Reversal
2019-10-11 PWM Lizard Bullish Bullish Day Trade Setup
2019-10-11 PWM Lower Bollinger Band Walk Weakness
2019-10-11 PWM New 52 Week Low Weakness
2019-10-11 PWM Hammer Candlestick Bullish
2019-10-11 SYH Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 SYH 1,2,3 Retracement Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 SYH Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-10-11 SYH NR7 Range Contraction
2019-10-11 SYH Boomer Sell Setup Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 U Fell Below 50 DMA Bearish
2019-10-11 U Fell Below 20 DMA Bearish
2019-10-11 U Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 U Bollinger Band Squeeze Range Contraction
2019-10-11 UEX Pocket Pivot Bullish Swing Setup
2019-10-11 UEX Crossed Above 20 DMA Bullish
2019-10-11 UEX Wide Range Bar Range Expansion
2019-10-11 URE Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-10-11 URE Bollinger Band Squeeze Range Contraction
2019-10-11 URE NR7 Range Contraction
2019-10-11 UWE Wide Range Bar Range Expansion
2019-10-11 UWE Fell Below 20 DMA Bearish
2019-10-11 VUI Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction

Uranium is a chemical element with symbol U and atomic number 92. It is a silvery-grey metal in the actinide series of the periodic table. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium is weakly radioactive because all isotopes of uranium are unstable, with half-lives varying between 159,200 years and 4.5 billion years. The most common isotopes in natural uranium are uranium-238 (which has 146 neutrons and accounts for over 99%) and uranium-235 (which has 143 neutrons). Uranium has the highest atomic weight of the primordially occurring elements. Its density is about 70% higher than that of lead, and slightly lower than that of gold or tungsten. It occurs naturally in low concentrations of a few parts per million in soil, rock and water, and is commercially extracted from uranium-bearing minerals such as uraninite.In nature, uranium is found as uranium-238 (99.2739–99.2752%), uranium-235 (0.7198–0.7202%), and a very small amount of uranium-234 (0.0050–0.0059%). Uranium decays slowly by emitting an alpha particle. The half-life of uranium-238 is about 4.47 billion years and that of uranium-235 is 704 million years, making them useful in dating the age of the Earth.
Many contemporary uses of uranium exploit its unique nuclear properties. Uranium-235 is the only naturally occurring fissile isotope, which makes it widely used in nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons. However, because of the tiny amounts found in nature, uranium needs to undergo enrichment so that enough uranium-235 is present. Uranium-238 is fissionable by fast neutrons, and is fertile, meaning it can be transmuted to fissile plutonium-239 in a nuclear reactor. Another fissile isotope, uranium-233, can be produced from natural thorium and is also important in nuclear technology. Uranium-238 has a small probability for spontaneous fission or even induced fission with fast neutrons; uranium-235 and to a lesser degree uranium-233 have a much higher fission cross-section for slow neutrons. In sufficient concentration, these isotopes maintain a sustained nuclear chain reaction. This generates the heat in nuclear power reactors, and produces the fissile material for nuclear weapons. Depleted uranium (238U) is used in kinetic energy penetrators and armor plating. Uranium is used as a colorant in uranium glass, producing lemon yellow to green colors. Uranium glass fluoresces green in ultraviolet light. It was also used for tinting and shading in early photography.
The 1789 discovery of uranium in the mineral pitchblende is credited to Martin Heinrich Klaproth, who named the new element after the recently discovered planet Uranus. Eugène-Melchior Péligot was the first person to isolate the metal and its radioactive properties were discovered in 1896 by Henri Becquerel. Research by Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner, Enrico Fermi and others, such as J. Robert Oppenheimer starting in 1934 led to its use as a fuel in the nuclear power industry and in Little Boy, the first nuclear weapon used in war. An ensuing arms race during the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union produced tens of thousands of nuclear weapons that used uranium metal and uranium-derived plutonium-239. The security of those weapons and their fissile material following the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991 is an ongoing concern for public health and safety. See Nuclear proliferation.

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